RE: Funny Money from Czechoslovakia - The Most Beautiful Banknotes

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Nice wall decoration definitely 😉

We have no banknotes under the 100 crowns now. 10, 20 and 50 nominals are only the coins in Czech Republic now.

We use banknotes in 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000 CZK. I have only two of them in my pocket now, but here you can see 🤣

img_3996.heic



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Oh no!!! Are they adding zeros? - That was the theme in my last two posts in this series, and I'm sure I'll keep mentioning it again when I make Funny Money posts in the future.

But those are neat looking bills too! Thanks for sharing. And yes, they are somewhat colorful too. Are the reverse sides as spectacular as the ones designed by Albín Brunovský?

Hahaha, I just HAD to look them up. Wow, I actually quite like the reverse images of today's Koruna bills! My favorite I think are the 200 and the 500 Kčs. Still, I imagine them as huge printouts on my wall! 😉

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Yes, it seems like they added zeros, because you own 20 crowns banknote with J. A. Komenský and now we use 200 crowns banknote with the portrait of the same man ;)

But in real, it is not based on hyperinflation. We have still 10, 20, 50 crowns, but only as a coins. On the other side, we have 1000, 2000, 5000 banknotes, which didn't exist before 1993.

Anyway, thanks for sharing your banknotes, because those I remember from my childhood ;)

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Oh wow, the crown seems to be a really hard currency! (I had no idea until I looked it up right now.) The 20 crown coin is close to a US dollar in value.

What I think is interesting, is how before 1993 there were no 1000 crown bills, which must have been worth $50 at least. So how did people make larger purchases? By carrying suitcases full of banknotes? It sounds like the opposite situation to Yugoslavia: they had too many zeros on their money, while you had too few.

Though having such a hard currency may be not so bad. Is that why the Czech Republic is reluctant to join the Euro zone?

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I don't remember exact worh of 1USD, but I think it was something aroun 30 crowns in 1993. Today it is 21-22 crowns.

If you were lucky enough and you could buy the new car from Škoda, you spent 90k Crowns in '90s and it was 180 pcs of 500 crown banknotes. The cheapest Škoda Fabia start somewhere 330k today, so you need only 66 psc of 5000CZK bills. But I think nobody pays new car in cash ;)

We are quite dependent on the Euro, but I hope we will keep Czech crowns as long as it will be possible ;) I think the common currency could only work in similarly productive economies. It doesn't make sense to have same currency eg. in Germany and in Greece. Just my opinion ;)

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Oh double WOW! That means the Crown gained value against the dollar over time!

As for buying cars with cash, just ask my dad. He financed a car once, and said never again. But even though he likes to pay for his car all at once, I don't think he uses actual cash, but something like a bank transfer.

Hehehe, "as long as possible" means as long as you want. After all, it's 100% the decision of the Czech republic, and no one else, to adopt the Euro or not. In Germany it's quite common to hear the same argument you made, that it doesn't make sense to have the same currency as Greece. But what's the next thing Germans usually say? Oh, that they had no choice in the matter, and that it was France that forced Germany into the Euro. Yeah, right! And if you look at Sweden or Denmark, I don't think they ever intend to join the Euro zone either. It's totally up to them.

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