It's good to be grateful, but conformity is something else.

in Project HOPE27 days ago

It's good to be grateful, but conformity is something else.

Gracias amigo @josevas217

imagen.png
Image

He who gives, and he who receives.

The human mind is such a diverse universe that it becomes incomprehensible, but just because it is complicated for others to enter your mind does not mean that one does not have the power to manage our mind.

The term gratefulness is profound meaning to recognize what they are doing for you with gratitude, it involves two parts the one that gives and the one that receives: the one that gives expects to be thanked and the one that receives should be thanked; then it will be okay this or the terms are being misunderstood, it could be habit or we should give without expecting anything in return. From here many things come out and individuality becomes evident where each one from his point of view acts as he thinks it is right, it is common to see someone annoyed because he gave something and says: "nor did he thank me" that expression is because he is convinced that he should be thanked, that is his conception.

Those who are used to receive.

Now, the question arises, So people should not be grateful for what they have received? If culturally yes, it is part of the values ​​and education, but the detail is to confuse the terms, it is good to thank and not be conformist, this is very confused by those who are used to receiving and therefore conformity arises to the point that they believe that they are always obliged to give them, this is not right; Although it is true that being grateful is a beautiful feeling of gratitude, I cannot settle and less get used to it because it cannot be my lifestyle, on the contrary, if something came along the way, thank you, but I keep working and forging that by myself. goal I want to achieve.

imagen.png
Image

If you are going to give, do not expect anything in return.

There is also another side is the person who gives, makes the mistake of giving and always expect to receive, that should not be so because then it is not sincere your gesture or action, I think as the saying goes "Do not let your left hand know what your right hand does" I subscribe every word, if you are going to give do it and do not expect anything in return.

This is how we humans act from the complication or misinterpretation of terms, they hardly want to change or modify customs of thousands of years and that is the big problem that almost nobody wants to give up and even less accept things, to live with more sincerity.

From my early age I was taught that I should be very grateful when I can do something for other people and never be conformist.


imagen.png


imagen.png



imagen.png


About us.png
imagen.png
I invite you to meet Multidisciplinary team
PROJECT.HOPE CURATION TRAIL

phlogo.pngimage.png

imagen.png


lanzgift.gif


imagen.png


Thanks for visiting, I appreciate your opinion.

"In constant evolution".

Sort:  

Hello Friend @lanzjoseg
Thanks for the mention.
Actually, there are many matrices of opinion when we deal with these points, but in the end I believe that each one handles his own truth, with which we may or may not agree, everything is valid.
I also believe that a minimum thank you is necessary when someone is helped, it is the minimum gesture of gratitude.
But at the same time I agree that one must help, and to do so without expecting anything in return, is logical.
Good week professor.

Hello friend, an interesting topic, I believe that to be grateful will always be an important gesture, the majority waits for it and I do not believe that this bad to do it, in addition to be grateful for the life that we have also must be something daily, every day we can do something new and that is something very valued.

Let us all learn to be honestly grateful. Those things that matter are not owed to us in a life where death is a part. Truly being grateful means harboring appreciation and value for the thing or matter. It is both a lesson and attribute that can always be refined. Thanks for the
reminder and insight.