Shopping expedition

I've been on the lookout for Sulcorebutia rauschii violacidermis for a couple of years now so I was pleased to find these. They were expensive but a good investment: they offset freely so you can sell them too.

S rauschii.jpg

The seller offered to courier them but I opted to go and collect, even though it meant driving to another town, because I thought she might have some other little gems and I wasn't disappointed: the tiny little one below is Mammillaria pectinifera, also one I've been looking for a long time and it was extremely cheap for what it is.

M pectinifera.jpg

I'm a huge fan of Astrophytum so I got these cute little seedlings, they are all different

Astro seedlings.jpg

A ornatum.jpg

below is Aloinopsis setifera, It seems to have been grown in the shade so it will need to be hardened gradually so that the growth form is more compact and colourful. I love those teeth!

Aloinopsis setifera.jpg

When I got home and was repotting and checking the plants, I spotted these two loose in a pot - they are very young cactus seedlings and I have no idea what they will be but she's got very interesting cacti so I'll be happy if I can get them to grow up.

seedlings.jpg

This is Haworthia truncata, called Horse's teeth here. It's a little dark after summer but should green up in the cooler weather

H truncata.jpg

Another gem: Haworthiopsis starkiana. She didn't know what it was and priced it very cheaply compared to what they normally go for. When it gets older, it gets a spiral form and grows in little clumps. This one already has a little offset peeping out in the front of the picture.

Haworthiopsis starkiana.jpg

I took a chance on these Conophytum, they may not be alive anymore because they are dormant in summer but should have emerged from their shells already so I dropped them in rainwater for a little while. While that seems heresy for desert plants, these plants grow in little cups in rocks in nature and when it rains, this is exactly what happens to them. After that, I potted them up and watered them. They will either emerge or they are goners. Time will tell

Conos.jpg

A very good Sunday drive this morning and it is always a pleasure to go and see someone's greenhouse. She grows a lot of carnivorous plants too and I was very tempted. She told me that sundews catch mosquitoes too. I think I'll be visiting there again!



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45 comments
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You have a Wonderful Collection!

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Thank you!

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Absolutely!
Have a Great Upcoming Week!
🙋🏻‍♀️👍🏼🌄👍🏼🙋🏻‍♀️

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I am still on the lookout for this Sulcorebutia. I saw it in an online shop once and then it was gone...
Mamillaria is lovely. At this stage looks like my Epithelantha.

Curious to see what those tiny seedlings will grow to :)

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I remember Ludmila said she wanted to send you a piece and the pigeons ruined it 🙄 The little white one may be an Epithelantha, I couldn't be sure right now but I'd be happy with that too.
I saw some incredible plants today!

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(Edited)

She did send a young offshoot of that destroyed one. It was very small and didn't survive the trip. Got too dehydrated. I planted it, but it was too late. I will get one eventually :)

I bet! :P

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@ewkaw , @nikv
The other day I was given three children of Sulcorebutia rauschii violacidermis, but unfortunately without roots and very small.
The largest of these three is 0.9 cm in diameter.
Hope someone survives.
Here is a photo
IMG_20220425_015951.jpg-30.jpg

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Good luck! Be patient and I'm sure you will succeed. I've grown extremely tiny offsets successfully, the thing to be careful of is letting the sun burn them

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Pretty! Fingers crossed :)

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@nikv , @ewkaw
Pigeons again dug up 6 cacti, and they dug up my Echeveria leukotrich and took it away :-(

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Oh no!! The person I bought these from also has pigeons destroying her plants. You need a net you can roll up and down so that you still have a view but they can't come and destroy when you are not around

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Lovely collection. I have given up on growing plants and have moved onto growing fungus. LOL I harvest a shitake about once every 3 months.

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Sounds good! Aren't mushrooms more work though?

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Not much at all ... spray them down every day and give them coffee grounds at the root. I bought a block though to get me started. I throw them in the fridge to kill off fruit flies and get them to produce.

It is a good use for coffee grounds and at worse you make some top soil.

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I want to see too! Please do a post on them

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I ate it ... LOL:) It was delicious. But the next time I get one:)

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A beautiful collection!

I don't know how much you spent on these new members but today I spent $15 on a virtual sale.

IMG-20220424-WA0024.jpg

Tomorrow I will travel about 10 miles to pick them up, and by the way I will see what else I can find because I really know how you felt buying more plants, I hope to have your knowledge someday.

Love your pics!

About Astrophytum are they difficult to keep healthy?

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What I got today cost $25 for all of them so it was a good deal. I like your new plants!

I find Astrophytum easy enough, I leave them outside in the rain in summer but I use a very fast-draining gravel mix. I found they preferred small plastic pots to clay.

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Wow, it was really a good deal, your Sulcorebutia rauschii violacidermis costs 25 dollars plus shipping in my country, I had never seen it in the nursery and apparently here it is very exotic.

As soon as I get a chance I will start buying Astrophytum too, they look beautiful and I have avoided buying for fear of not knowing how to take care of them, thanks for the advice on the pot, it is amazing that it is like that, I would think the clay one would be better but this is why I come to your experience.

I found a page on Facebook of a nursery where they sell very cheap and put a huge amount of cacti and succulents, I even saw peyotes at a very good price, one of these days I will take the risk to see if they are trustable. Because to travel to the nursery I would have to drive over 350 miles haha.

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When I had Astrophytum in clay it didn't grow and got root mealybugs and I was surprised it survived. The ones I bought here are very young and small and I paid 3 dollars for all of them. I prefer to buy plants that are young and cheap because many succulents dislike being moved around and the bigger and older they are, the less they like it. This is especially true of mesembs.
The person I got these from told me of a cactus she bought for $420 that rotted 7 days after she got it. I would never take such a chance and cannot afford it anyway, I won't spend more than $15 on a plant. They will take some years to get big but they are more likely to survive if they spend those years in one place in your greenhouse.

In general, I have had good experience buying plants through Facebook sellers but I know that there are plenty of scammers so check the reviews very carefully. It is also true that plants grown 350 miles away might be used to very different climatic conditions and dislike the new environment. If you are patient, you will get what you want locally, at the price you want

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I love this one, it looks cute.

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They are cute, I had one about 12 years ago. Hopefully I don't kill this one

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Let's pray for that (^_^)

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I won't pray, I'll be more careful. When it comes to succulents, we all live with our mistakes

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Wow, how beautiful all those cacti are. Hopefully the tiny little sprouts you found will survive.
And the dried ones I hope they survive. I would also do the same as you and that is try to rescue it.

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I found more sprouts today and now they are 9, I'm sure some will survive. I'm not very hopeful about the dried conophytums, to be honest

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Now that's a nice gift you've been given.
Have faith and wait for the dried cacti.

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Incredibly awesome creativity indeed luv ur collection dear. God bless you dear.

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She told me that sundews catch mosquitoes too

Thus caught my attention and I'm so gonna go find this plant because it's really gonna be of great help if it catches mosquitoes.

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You'd need to get your hands on Specie like Drosera binata, not the more common flat rosette species

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Thanks for the recommendation. I really appreciate

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This is a lovely collection @nikv,
The Sulcorebutia Rauschii Violacidermis is spectaular with that purple hue, I really like that one a lot.
The Aloinopsis Setifera seems really special too, and the rest are all attractive in their own ways.
Reading about your friends carnivorous plants is reminding me I need to find some bugs for the Flytraps, I have this feeling the are very hungry and ready for some food.

I hope those Conophytum come to life :)

Great post as always my friend, thank you for sharing, I look forward to seeing more!

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You have wonderful looking succulents, Nikv @nikv. I could use some sundews here when the mosquitoes attack this summer. :).

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Thank you! We all could use some sundews, I wonder how they do it?

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